Resources for PreK-8 Activity 81 – Living with Fire

Students learn about the three elements a fire needs to burn and find out how an understanding of this “fire triangle” can be used to both prevent and manage wildland fires.

This is one of 96 activities that can be found in PLT’s PreK-8 Environmental Education Activity Guide. To get the activity, attend a training either in person or online and receive PLT’s PreK-8 Guide. Below are some supporting resources for this activity. 

STUDENT PAGES

Download the copyright free student pages that are included with this activity:

Fire Triangle Worksheet (PDF)

 

Spanish Student Page(s):

Hoja de Trabajo el Triangulo del Fuego (PDF)

STEM STRATEGIES

Engage students in real-world applications of STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) education.

Try these STEM Connections for this PLT activity:

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Every month we carefully select new tools and resources that enhance PLT’s lessons. These include educational apps, videos, posters, interactive websites, careers information, and teacher-generated materials. Browse a chronological listing below:

  • Foldable 3-D Fire Triangle Model

    Simply print out and then fold this 3-Dimensional fire triangle model to help teach the 3 elements of the fire triangle, as well as to show the important connections between weather and how it influences fire behavior.

  • Forest Restoration Following Wildfire

    Learn about the Tree and Forest restoration process after a wildfire with this comprehensive resource from Montana State University  (MSU) Extension Forestry. In addition, MSU Extension has compiled multiple other resources that help students understand implications of wildfires. Students can read a about a 13-Year Case Study of Fire in the Northern Rockies, use a photo guide to assess wildfire severity, or learn how to develop a fire hazard reduction plan.

  • Fire Safety Basics

    Fire safety is an important part of keeping ourselves safe at home. With simple solutions and planning ahead, we can keep ourselves, families, pets, and possessions safe and out of harms way. Fires can start for many different reasons and the first step to success is to know and understand potential fire hazards. The following is a basic guide to help you learn about fire safety and the different steps to protect yourself in the case of a fire.

  • Handy Dandy Safety Guides – Fire and Winter

    Home Security Systems had put together printable, interactive packets to teach children about fire and winter safety practices. The two Handy Dandy Safety Guides consist of games that will help children have fun while learning basic safety principles. 

  • Ring of Fire

    WildFIRE PIRE is a project of the Montana State University, involving an international team of scientists putting the past, present, and future of wildfire into global perspective. The group will use thousands of years’ worth of historical data on landscape vegetation, fire, human behavior, and climate to build a computer simulation to understand how future changes in climate and human factors might affect vegetation patterns in global forests. To learn about their process and findings, you can read more, or check out their overview video.

  • Fire Safety Website

    Fire safety resources are available at www.firefacts.org. Teacher resources include a Jeopardy-style game on basic fire safety practices, fact sheets, family take-home activities, and links to additional fire safety resources and organizations. Student resources consist of online games and puzzles that teach fire safety rules.

  • Fire and Conservation Interactive Quiz

    Get fired up and take The Nature Conservancy’s online quiz to test your knowledge about fire and how it can be used as a tool to help people and wildlife.  A scoring chart helps you to find local volunteer opportunities and other ideas for voicing your support for more American forest restoration by being fire smart!

  • Federal Registry for Educational Excellence – Fire Safety

    Review fire safety practices with information and resources from the U.S. Fire Administration, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the Centers for Disease Control. You’ll find information about smoke alarms and fire extinguishers, kitchen safety, fire safety plans, and visits to a fire station. In addition, teachers can access online activities such as word searches, puzzles, and interactive quizzes that reinforce important fire safety messages.